"The Downside Of Being The Boss"
John Rennie finds it's great to be editor in chief of Scientific American, but not when all the ingredients of sarin gas are in his office.
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Esther Perel
Science & sexuality
Esther Perel's career gets an unexpected boost from the Bill Clinton/Monica Lewinsky scandal.
Mara Wilson
A love affair of a lifetime (with science)
As a kid, Mara Wilson is decidedly uninterested in science, but as she grows up she starts to look for answers in new places.
Meehan Crist
My mother's brain
When Meehan Crist was a child, her mother hit her head. It was only as an adult that she discovered that her mother was covering up something far more serious: something called rather ironically a "mild traumatic brain injury."
Daniela Schiller
A new last memory (explicit)
Neuroscientist Daniela Schiller studies the emotional components of memory. In her previous story her research helped her begin to understand her father, a holocaust survivor. But that story led to a whole new chapter in their relationship, and her understanding of memories.
John Rennie
A college course forces John Rennie to confront a furious rat, and himself.
Moran Cerf
Being dead while being alive
Moran Cerf's life is spun around when a computer glitch declares him dead -- but that's nothing compared to what happens when a real funeral comes around.
Andrew Revkin
My lucky stroke
When he begins showing strange symptoms on a jog though the mountains, science writer Andrew Revkin discovers just how close to death he is.
Sarah Everts
Bitten in a foreign country
While visiting Guatemala Sarah Everts is bitten by a dog, so she goes looking for a rabies shot. But coming home to Canada is when the real problem started.
Stuart Firestein
A mentor with a nose for science
After a career as a theater manager, Stuart Firestein takes a biology class, which leads him to a completely new life, and a lot of salamander noses.
Paula Croxson
When your grandmother forgets who you are
When Paula Croxson began to study memory as a neuroscientist, she also learned a new way of thinking about her grandmother's failing memory.